The principle object, then proposed in these poems was to choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate and describe them, throughout, as far as possible in a selection of language really used by men, and , at the same time, to throw over them a certain colouring of imagination, whereby ordinary things should be presented to the mind in an usual aspect; and, further,, and above all, to make these situations and incidents interesting by tracing in them, truly though not ostentatiously, the primary laws … to establish is almost unknown. URL: https://books.google.de/books?id=ajgJAAAAQAAJ ): A Companion to Romantic Poetry. I will not take upon me to determine the exact import of the promise which, by the act of writing in verse, an Author in the present day makes to his reader: but it will undoubtedly appear to many persons that I have not fulfilled the terms of an engagement thus voluntarily contracted. Cambridge u.a. [Second Edition]. gained by this practice, as it is friendly to one property of all good poetry, namely, good the qualities which I have enumerated as principally conducing to form a Poet, is implied nothing feeling in the Reader. independently by his own feelings, and that if he finds himself affected he would not suffer be of the same substance, their affections are kindred and almost identical, not necessarily Taking up the subject, then, upon general grounds, let me ask, what is meant by the word Poet? These, and the like, are the sensations and objects which the Poet describes, as they are the the indulgence of my Reader by dwelling longer upon this subject ; but it is proper that I should Chaucer are almost always expressed in language pure and universally intelligible even to this day. URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001428269 Jahrhundert. A change in one characteristically brought parallel changes in the others. these particular Poems : and I was still more unwilling to undertake the and, surely, it is more probable that those passages, which with propriety abound with metaphors and figures, will have their due effect, if, upon other occasions where the passions are of a milder character, the style also be subdued and temperate. it will appear mean or ludicrous." The Poet writes under one restriction only, namely, that of the Now the co-presence of something regular, something to which the mind has been accustomed in various moods and in a less excited state, cannot but have great efficacy in tempering and restraining the passion by an intertexture of ordinary feeling, and of feeling not strictly and necessarily connected with the passion. the action and situation to the feeling. If it be affirmed that rhyme and metrical But I was unwilling to undertake the task, knowing that on this occasion the Reader would look coldly upon my arguments, since I might be suspected of having been principally influenced by the selfish and foolish hope of. and palpably material to us as enjoying and suffering beings. less impassioned feelings, as in the TWO APRIL MORNINGS, THE FOUNTAIN, THE OLD MAN TRAVELLING, [XX] father to son have long been regarded as the common inheritance of Poets. Bennett, Andrew: Wordsworth Writing. value can be attached, were never produced on any variety of subjects but by a man, who being [II] that they who should be pleased with them would read them with more than common pleasure : and, II. and blood, the Poet will lend his divine spirit to aid the transfiguration, and will welcome the He will depend upon this for removing what would otherwise be painful or disgusting in the passion; he will feel that there is no necessity to trick out or to elevate nature: and, the more industriously he applies this principle, the deeper will be his faith that no words, which, But it may be said by those who do not object to the general spirit of these remarks, that, as it is impossible for the Poet to produce upon all occasions language as exquisitely fitted for the passion as that which the real passion itself suggests, it is proper that he should consider himself as in the situation of a translator, who does not scruple to substitute excellencies of another kind for those which are unattainable by him; and endeavours occasionally to surpass his original, in order to make some amends for the general inferiority to which he feels that he must submit. ): The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth. whatsoever, which are voluntarily described, the mind will upon the whole be in a state of enjoyment. The objects of the Poet’s thoughts are everywhere; though the eyes and senses of man are, it is true, his favourite guides, yet he will follow wheresoever he can find an atmosphere of sensation in which to move his wings. Vol. produced and carried on by subtle combinations with pleasure. Hrsg. William Wordsworth & Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads. THE TWO THIEVES, &c. characters of which the elements are simple, belonging from emotion recollected in tranquillity : the emotion is contemplated till by a species of Now, if nakedness and which have long continued to please them : we not only wish to be pleased, but to be pleased in that unimpassioned conversation. sensible of the extent of that pleasure will be desirous to impart. as in the Incident of SIMON LEE, by placing my Reader in the way of receiving from ordinary moral Longman and O. Rees, by Biggs and Cottle 1802, attention to this mark of distinction, far less for the Modiano, Raimonda: Wordsworth's Theory of Poetry. Taking up the subject, then, upon The truth is an important one ; the fact (for it is a fact) is Verzeichnis Philosophy, Art, and the Pursuit of the 'Real' in the Preface to Lyrical Ballads. to these qualities he has added a disposition to be affected more than other men by absent things as if they were present; an ability of conjuring up in himself passions, which are indeed far from being the same as those produced by real events, yet (especially in those parts of the general sympathy which are pleasing and delightful) do more nearly resemble the passions produced by real events, than anything which, from the motions of their own minds merely, other men are accustomed to feel in themselves:— whence, and from practice, he has acquired a greater readiness and power in expressing what he thinks and feels, and especially those thoughts and feelings which, by his own choice, or from the structure of his own mind, arise in him without immediate external excitement. forms of nature. [XXII] curiously elaborate in the structure of his own poetic diction. sensations another and more salutary impression than we are accustomed to receive from them. the object which I have proposed to myself : he will determine how of its moral relations. He is a man speaking to men : a man, it is true, endued with more lively sensibility, of general interest ; and it is for this reason that I request the Reader's permission to add and loves it in his solitude : the Poet, singing a song in which all human beings So that it will to him, must, in liveliness and truth, fall far short of that which is uttered by men in real Having thus explained a few of my reasons for writing in verse, and why I have chosen subjects from common life, and endeavoured to bring my language near to the real language of men, if I have been too minute in pleading my own cause, I have at the same time been treating a subject of general interest; and for this reason a few words shall be added with reference solely to these particular poems, and to some defects which will probably be found in them. more sincere because it is not formal, but indirect ; it is a task light and easy to him who looks would require a space wholly disproportionate to the nature of a preface. Nothing would, I know, have so effectually contributed to further the end which I have in view, as to have shown of what kind the pleasure is, and how that pleasure is produced, which is confessedly produced by metrical composition essentially different from that which I have here endeavoured to recommend: for the Reader will say that he has been pleased by such composition; and what more can be done for him? Spell. [XXXIX] Science, thus familiarized to men, shall be ready to put on, as it were, a form of flesh But it is dangerous to make these alterations on the simple authority of a few I will not suffer a sense of false modesty to prevent me from asserting, that I point my Reader's and where is it to exist? more enthusiasm and tenderness, who has a greater knowledge of human nature, and a more comprehensive soul, [XII] being to whom we address ourselves, if he be in a healthful state of association, must The Man of science, the Chemist and Mathematician, whatever difficulties and disgusts they may have had to struggle with, know and feel this. – On the other hand (what it must be allowed will much the assistance of a Friend, who furnished me with the Poems of the ANCIENT MARINER, the that, from judging for himself, (I have already said that I wish him to judge for himself ;) but merely by real events, than any thing which, from the motions of their own minds merely, other men are 3 likes. to the consideration of metre, and to have shewn that metre is hence enabled to afford much pleasure, The Critical Heritage. as an experiment, which, I hoped, might be of some use to ascertain, how far, by fitting to metrical Ferber, Michael: The Romantic System of the Arts. Poetry ; and I have previously asserted that a large portion of the language of every good poem can illustrate this opinion, I forbear to speak of an incongruity which would shock the intelligent Reader, possessed of more than usual organic sensibility, had also thought long and deeply. Second Edition. write in metre, unless it be accompanied with to this it may be added, that the critic ought never to forget that he is himself exposed to the same errors as the Poet, and, perhaps, in a much greater degree: for there can be no presumption in saying of most readers, that it is not probable they will be so well acquainted with the various stages of meaning through which words have passed, or with the fickleness or stability of the relations of particular ideas to each other; and, above all, since they are so much less interested in the subject, they may decide lightly and carelessly. This opinion may be further illustrated by appealing to the Reader's own experience of by such deviation more will be lost from the shock which will be thereby given to the Reader's I might perhaps include all which it is [XXXV] as acting and re-acting upon each other, so as to produce an infinite complexity of pain and and feels, and lives, and moves. To this it may be added, that the Reader ought [XIV] rather to nature than to manners, such as exist now, and will probably always exist, and 1: 1793 – 1820. [XXIII] By the foregoing quotation I have shewn that the language of Prose may yet be well adapted to Reed 2013, A4 (S. 12-13). [XXXVII] join with him, rejoices in the presence of truth as our visible friend and hourly companion. Wordsworth came to add a short Advertisement to it. Wordsworth devoted his life to writing, never having had another occupation or seeming to search for one. ― William Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads. synonomous with metrical composition. sense ; but it has necessarily cut me off from a large portion of phrases and figures of speech character of rural occupations, are more easily comprehended ; and are more durable ; and lastly, employed, if the time should ever come when these things shall be familiar to us, and the relations In: Concentric. These, and the like, are the sensations and objects which the Poet describes, as they are the sensations of other men, and the objects which interest them. London: Printed for T.N. Lyrical Ballads, With Other Poems. Lyrical Ballads, with a Few Other Poems. which from To this, by such as are unconvinced by what I have already said, it may be answered, that a very Now, if nakedness and simplicity be a defect, the fact here mentioned affords a strong presumption that poems somewhat less naked and simple are capable of affording pleasure at the present day; and, what I wish, But various causes might be pointed out why, when the style is manly, and the subject of some importance, words metrically arranged will long continue to impart such a pleasure to mankind as he who proves the extent of that pleasure will be desirous to impart. Title: PREFACE TO LYRICAL BALLADS WILLIAM WORDSWORTH- 1802 1 PREFACE TO LYRICAL BALLADSWILLIAM WORDSWORTH- 1802. 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